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General Moving Tips for California Residents

  • Clear out unwanted goods – hold a garage sale.
  • Get rid of flammables – paint, petrol, gas cylinders.
  • Empty fuel from mowers, clippers, trimmers and so on.
  • Clothes – do you need them all? Charity shops may want them.
  • Separate books – disposable, family reading, valuable.
  • Check all electrical goods – will they work in the new home?
  • Start making up your change of address list.
  • Arrange to have mail forwarded.
  • Arrange termination date for electricity, gas, oil, telephone and other main suppliers.
  • If you are taking electrical goods such as a stereo, see if you still have their original boxes.
  • Have rugs cleaned.
  • If you have children, separate cherished toys to travel with you.
  • Round up personal documentation – marriage/birth certificates, driving licenses and so on.
  • Keep passports separate so they are not packed.
  • Want to take the car? Check on import regulations and the duty payable.
  • With regards to family pets– make sure vaccinations and documentation are up to date.
  • Will your new home be ready? If not, you need to arrange temporary storage.
  • Shops, schools, theaters, life styles – it’s never too early to find out about your new home.
  • Start running down freezer stocks.
  • Arrange your finances – close or transfer bank accounts, savings accounts and so on, if necessary.

Packing Materials

Use only strong, corrugated cartons with covers. We can supply you with specially made cartons, for everything from mattresses to clothing and mirrors. The added protection of mover-provided cartons may avoid damage that results from the use of poor-quality packing materials. Your alternative is to collect boxes discarded by your grocery or liquor store. Save old newspapers for use in packing, but remember that ink may rub off and stain clothing or other items. *WARNING: Insect eggs and insects such as roaches can travel in food boxes.
Keep this in mind when getting boxes from food stores. Here’s a list a packing supplies that will come in handy:

  • Plastic bags and labels for easy identification.
  • Foam peanuts, Styrofoam pellets or “popcorn.”
  • Tissue or craft paper for delicate packing jobs.
  • Corrugated paper rolls for figurines and fragile items.
  • Gummed tape (1 1/2 to 2 inches wide) and/or strong twine for sealing cartons.
  • Markers and labels for identifying contents of cartons.
  • Notebook and pencil for carton identification log.
  • Scissors and/or sharp knife.

Packing Pointers

Before actually packing-up, you need to have a game plan. For example:

  • Pack one room at a time. This will help you when it comes time to unpack.
  • Pack a couple of cartons a day, starting well ahead of the move.
  • Mark all boxes, designating room and box number. Make a carton identification log to show the number of boxes packed per room, and the total number of cartons packed. It’s a good idea to leave space in your log for a special comments section to note carton conditions or location of high value goods. Notify your mover of any high value items.
  • Be sure to have plenty of “filling” material available.
  • Be sure that the bottoms of all cartons are secured and will hold the weight of the contents.
  • Packing tape or gummed tape is better than masking tape.
  • Pack heavier items toward the bottom of the box and lighter items toward the top. Try to keep a per-box weight of 50 pounds or less; it makes moving a lot easier. A general rule to remember on carton size — the heavier the item, the smaller the carton.

Packing Dish-ware

  • Select a medium-sized carton (or mover provided dishpack) and line the bottom of the carton with crumpled packing paper.
  • With packing paper stacked neatly in place on a work table, center one plate on the paper.
  • Grasp a corner on several sheets of packing paper and pull the paper over the plate until sheets completely cover the plate. Stack a second plate on and, moving clockwise, grasp a second corner and pull sheets over the second plate.
  • Stack a third plate. Grasp remaining two corners, folding two sheets of each corner (one at a time) over the plate.
  • Turn your wrapped stack of plates upside down onto your packing paper.
  • Re-wrap the entire bundle: start with one corner of packing paper and pull two sheets over the bundle, cover bundle with next corner, then the third corner; and finally, the fourth.
  • Seal the bundle with packing tape.
  • Place the bundle of dish-ware in a medium-size box so that the plates are standing on edge

Use this process on all saucers, bread and butter dishes, and other dishware. When packing smaller dishes, you may choose to stack in greater quantity.

Packing Cups

  • With packing paper in place on the work table, position one cup six to eight inches from one of the corners.
  • Now pull the near corner of the paper up and over the cup.
  • Nest a second cup directly on top, with handle to left (second cup should “nest” itself in packing paper folded over the bottom cups).
  • Pull the two side corners up and over, one at a time, and tuck corners inside the top cup.
  • Hold the bottom and top cup in position and roll cups to the remaining corner. Fragile mixing bowls may be rolled in the same manner.
  • Delicate cups, like china, should be wrapped one at a time. Antique glass or china should be stuffed with crumpled tissue and wrapped one at a time.

Packing Glasses and Stemware

  • Stuff glasses and stemware with crumpled tissue or packing paper before wrapping.
  • Lay on the corner of packing paper and roll it one or two full rotations (depending on size); pull sides of packing paper up and over glass/stemware and continue rolling to the far corner. Corrugated paper rolls or cellular boxes may be used for added protection.
  • Place glasses and stemware toward the top of your box. Heavier items (dish-ware, pitchers,etc.) should be placed toward the bottom of the box.

Delicate glassware and stemware should be placed in an upright position, not on its side.
No matter what you’re packing, you should use crumpled packing paper in between each layer to assure a snug fit wherever there’s a gap. All boxes with “fragile” items should be marked accordingly.

Specialized Packing Tips

The list of individual household items is endless. Most can be packed by following our packing pointers. Here are some additional packing tips for major items. If you want a more comprehensive list of how to pack special items, drop us a line.
Bureau Drawers — Don’t overload. Too heavy a load can cause damage. Remove firearms and any items that might break or leak. Firearms, along with serial numbers, must be registered with your van line representative before the move.
Canned Goods and Other Non-Frozen Food — Pack upright with no more than 24-30 cans per carton. Don’t attempt to move perishables. Wrap glass containers and boxed foods individually and pack in small cartons.
Frozen Foods and Plants — Because of the delicate and perishable nature of these items, your mover is prohibited from accepting these packed items when your shipment is being transported more than 150 miles and/or delivery will not be accomplished within twenty-four (24) hours from the time of loading. Frozen food shipped within these guidelines must be packed in a freezer which at time of loading is at normal deep-freeze temperature.
Clocks — Remove or secure pendulum in large clocks. Grandfather clocks should be prepared for moving by expert servicemen.
Drapes and Curtains — Hang drapes over crossbars in wardrobe cartons, or pack folded in clean cartons. Remove curtains from rods, fold and pack in cartons or bureau drawers.
Flammables and Combustibles — Flammable liquids and aerosol cans must not be packed. Changes in temperature and pressure can cause them to leak, or even explode. For your own protection, you should know that if you pack these items and they cause damage to your shipment or others, you, not your mover, may be held liable.
Lamps and Lampshades — Remove bulbs, harps and shades. Roll up cord. Pack lamps with bedding or wrap separately and place upright in clean, tissue-lined carton. Wrap harp and finial (decorative knob) with packing paper and tape to inside wall of carton that contains shade. Wrap shades in tissue, not newspaper. Place upright in large, tissue lined cartons.
Medicines — Seal caps with masking tape. Wrap and pack upright in small cartons. If needed during travel, carry with you.
Mirrors, Paintings and Pictures — Tell your agent about valuable paintings for special care. Wrap small mirrors, pictures, paintings, and frames and place on edge in cartons. Place large pictures and paintings on edge in heavy cardboard containers. Large wall or dresser mirrors will be taken down by the movers and placed in special cartons. For added safety, place tape diagonally across mirror to protect better against damage. Do not place newspaper directly against paintings.
Personal Computers and Video Recorders — Pack valuable electronic equipment in original cartons when available. Otherwise, use strong, corrugated cartons and place protective padding on the bottom of the carton. Wrap an old blanket or protective pad around the item and place it in its carton. Place additional padding between the carton and the computer or video recorder. Wrap cords separately, label to identify usage and place in a plastic bag away from delicate surfaces. Non-detachable cords should also be wrapped. Place cords between the padded computer or video recorder and the carton. Be sure your personal computer is “parked” and ready for transport.
Silverware — Wrap each piece in cloth or low sulfur content paper to prevent tarnishing. Use an old blanket or moving pad as a wrap to prevent scratching the silverware chest.
Tools — Drain fuel from power tools (do not ship Flammables under any circumstances). Pack tools in small, strong cartons. Wrap separately if valuable.
Waterbed Mattresses — Drain all water from the waterbed and, grasping internal baffle systems with external vinyl, fold mattress 20 inches at a time. Adjust folds to avoid making creases across individual baffles. Consult your owner’s manual for special instructions concerning the care and transportation of your mattress. Do not place your mattress in a carton with sharp or pointed objects.
Cars and Motorcycles — Cars and motorcycles shipped on the moving van should be drained nearly empty of fuel. Motorcycle batteries should be disconnected. Automobile antifreeze should be ample to protect against severe cold in winter.
Barbecue Grills and Propane Tanks — Wrap grates and briquettes separately in a newspaper (or place all briquettes into a grocery bag) and place parts in carton. Pad carton with paper to reduce movement of contents. Propane tanks cannot be moved. Consult your local gas grill distributor for the safest method.

Check out our Moving Boxes and Accessories for Less! We’ve teamed up with one of our affiliates to offer you the lowest prices and fastest shipping on moving supplies anywhere on the web. Our moving kits contain everything you need to keep your move organized including different size moving boxes, packing paper, labels, tape, bubble wrap and even a marker… you can even order boxes and accessories separately to design your own package. You’ll have everything you need for your move to be delivered quickly, right to your door!

Packing can be the most frustrating part of moving but with our tips and tricks, you can learn to pack like a pro and move into your next home with ease!

Packing is one of the most stressful parts of any move, but with our tips and tricks it can go by in the blink of Large house moving kitsan eye! The main part of packing is to make sure you are organized and prepared for your move. Our movers will always make sure that your larger items are packed correctly so they can be moved without damage, but for items you pack yourselves, follow the tips below to make your move as smooth as possible!

Packing Materials

Use only strong, corrugated cartons with covers. We can supply you with specially made cartons, for everything from mattresses to clothing and mirrors. The added protection of mover-provided cartons may avoid damage that results from the use of poor-quality packing materials. Your alternative is to collect boxes discarded by your grocery or liquor store. Save old newspapers for use in packing, but remember that ink may rub off and stain clothing or other items. *WARNING: Insect eggs and insects such as roaches can travel in food boxes.
Keep this in mind when getting boxes from food stores. Here’s a list a packing supplies that will come in handy:

  • Plastic bags and labels for easy identification.
  • Foam peanuts, Styrofoam pellets or “popcorn.”
  • Tissue or craft paper for delicate packing jobs.
  • Corrugated paper rolls for figurines and fragile items.
  • Gummed tape (1 1/2 to 2 inches wide) and/or strong twine for sealing cartons.
  • Markers and labels for identifying contents of cartons.
  • Notebook and pencil for carton identification log.
  • Scissors and/or sharp knife.
Packing Pointers

Before actually packing-up, you need to have a game plan. For example:

  • Pack one room at a time. This will help you when it comes time to unpack.
  • Pack a couple of cartons a day, starting well ahead of the move.
  • Mark all boxes, designating room and box number. Make a carton identification log to show the number of boxes packed per room, and the total number of cartons packed. It’s a good idea to leave space in your log for a special comments section to note carton conditions or location of high value goods. Notify your mover of any high value items.
  • Be sure to have plenty of “filling” material available.
  • Be sure that the bottoms of all cartons are secured and will hold the weight of the contents.
  • Packing tape or gummed tape is better than masking tape.
  • Pack heavier items toward the bottom of the box and lighter items toward the top. Try to keep a per-box weight of 50 pounds or less; it makes moving a lot easier. A general rule to remember on carton size — the heavier the item, the smaller the carton.
Packing Dish-ware
  • Select a medium-sized carton (or mover provided dishpack) and line the bottom of the carton with crumpled packing paper.
  • With packing paper stacked neatly in place on a work table, center one plate on the paper.
  • Grasp a corner on several sheets of packing paper and pull the paper over the plate until sheets completely cover the plate. Stack a second plate on and, moving clockwise, grasp a second corner and pull sheets over the second plate.
  • Stack a third plate. Grasp remaining two corners, folding two sheets of each corner (one at a time) over the plate.
  • Turn your wrapped stack of plates upside down onto your packing paper.
  • Re-wrap the entire bundle: start with one corner of packing paper and pull two sheets over the bundle, cover bundle with next corner, then the third corner; and finally, the fourth.
  • Seal the bundle with packing tape.
  • Place the bundle of dish-ware in a medium-size box so that the plates are standing on edge

Use this process on all saucers, bread and butter dishes, and other dishware. When packing smaller dishes, you may choose to stack in greater quantity.

Packing Cups
  • With packing paper in place on the work table, position one cup six to eight inches from one of the corners.
  • Now pull the near corner of the paper up and over the cup.
  • Nest a second cup directly on top, with handle to left (second cup should “nest” itself in packing paper folded over the bottom cups).
  • Pull the two side corners up and over, one at a time, and tuck corners inside the top cup.
  • Hold the bottom and top cup in position and roll cups to the remaining corner. Fragile mixing bowls may be rolled in the same manner.
  • Delicate cups, like china, should be wrapped one at a time. Antique glass or china should be stuffed with crumpled tissue and wrapped one at a time.
Packing Glasses and Stemware
  • Stuff glasses and stemware with crumpled tissue or packing paper before wrapping.
  • Lay on the corner of packing paper and roll it one or two full rotations (depending on size); pull sides of packing paper up and over glass/stemware and continue rolling to the far corner. Corrugated paper rolls or cellular boxes may be used for added protection.
  • Place glasses and stemware toward the top of your box. Heavier items (dish-ware, pitchers,etc.) should be placed toward the bottom of the box.

Delicate glassware and stemware should be placed in an upright position, not on its side.
No matter what you’re packing, you should use crumpled packing paper in between each layer to assure a snug fit wherever there’s a gap. All boxes with “fragile” items should be marked accordingly.

Specialized Packing Tips

The list of individual household items is endless. Most can be packed by following our packing pointers. Here are some additional packing tips for major items. If you want a more comprehensive list of how to pack special items, drop us a line.
Bureau Drawers — Don’t overload. Too heavy a load can cause damage. Remove firearms and any items that might break or leak. Firearms, along with serial numbers, must be registered with your van line representative before the move.
Canned Goods and Other Non-Frozen Food — Pack upright with no more than 24-30 cans per carton. Don’t attempt to move perishables. Wrap glass containers and boxed foods individually and pack in small cartons.
Frozen Foods and Plants — Because of the delicate and perishable nature of these items, your mover is prohibited from accepting these packed items when your shipment is being transported more than 150 miles and/or delivery will not be accomplished within twenty-four (24) hours from the time of loading. Frozen food shipped within these guidelines must be packed in a freezer which at time of loading is at normal deep-freeze temperature.
Clocks — Remove or secure pendulum in large clocks. Grandfather clocks should be prepared for moving by expert servicemen.
Drapes and Curtains — Hang drapes over crossbars in wardrobe cartons, or pack folded in clean cartons. Remove curtains from rods, fold and pack in cartons or bureau drawers.
Flammables and Combustibles — Flammable liquids and aerosol cans must not be packed. Changes in temperature and pressure can cause them to leak, or even explode. For your own protection, you should know that if you pack these items and they cause damage to your shipment or others, you, not your mover, may be held liable.
Lamps and Lampshades — Remove bulbs, harps and shades. Roll up cord. Pack lamps with bedding or wrap separately and place upright in clean, tissue-lined carton. Wrap harp and finial (decorative knob) with packing paper and tape to inside wall of carton that contains shade. Wrap shades in tissue, not newspaper. Place upright in large, tissue lined cartons.
Medicines — Seal caps with masking tape. Wrap and pack upright in small cartons. If needed during travel, carry with you.
Mirrors, Paintings and Pictures — Tell your agent about valuable paintings for special care. Wrap small mirrors, pictures, paintings, and frames and place on edge in cartons. Place large pictures and paintings on edge in heavy cardboard containers. Large wall or dresser mirrors will be taken down by the movers and placed in special cartons. For added safety, place tape diagonally across mirror to protect better against damage. Do not place newspaper directly against paintings.
Personal Computers and Video Recorders — Pack valuable electronic equipment in original cartons when available. Otherwise, use strong, corrugated cartons and place protective padding on the bottom of the carton. Wrap an old blanket or protective pad around the item and place it in its carton. Place additional padding between the carton and the computer or video recorder. Wrap cords separately, label to identify usage and place in a plastic bag away from delicate surfaces. Non-detachable cords should also be wrapped. Place cords between the padded computer or video recorder and the carton. Be sure your personal computer is “parked” and ready for transport.
Silverware — Wrap each piece in cloth or low sulfur content paper to prevent tarnishing. Use an old blanket or moving pad as a wrap to prevent scratching the silverware chest.
Tools — Drain fuel from power tools (do not ship Flammables under any circumstances). Pack tools in small, strong cartons. Wrap separately if valuable.
Waterbed Mattresses — Drain all water from the waterbed and, grasping internal baffle systems with external vinyl, fold mattress 20 inches at a time. Adjust folds to avoid making creases across individual baffles. Consult your owner’s manual for special instructions concerning the care and transportation of your mattress. Do not place your mattress in a carton with sharp or pointed objects.
Cars and Motorcycles — Cars and motorcycles shipped on the moving van should be drained nearly empty of fuel. Motorcycle batteries should be disconnected. Automobile antifreeze should be ample to protect against severe cold in winter.
Barbecue Grills and Propane Tanks — Wrap grates and briquettes separately in a newspaper (or place all briquettes into a grocery bag) and place parts in carton. Pad carton with paper to reduce movement of contents. Propane tanks cannot be moved. Consult your local gas grill distributor for the safest method.

Any other packing tips you have found helpful!?

Summer is here and the time of year when most people decide to make the big move. Since this is one of the busiest times of the year, it is important to be prepared for your move! We have decided to share some of our general moving tips to help you make your moving day a success!

General Moving Tips

Before Your Move:

  • Clear out unwanted goods – hold a garage sale or donate your unwanted goods to a charity
    • extra clothes? See if there is a shelter near you that may want them?
    • extra business clothing can be donated to awesome companies like Dress for Success that help outfit people for jobs or job interviews
    • Separate books – disposable, family reading, valuable.
  • Get rid of flammables – paint, petrol, gas cylinders.
  • Empty fuel from mowers, clippers, trimmers and so on.
  • Start making up your change of address list.
    • Arrange to have mail forwarded.
  • Want to take the car? Check on import regulations and the duty payable (if traveling internationally)
  • Have rugs cleaned.
  • Arrange termination date for electricity, gas, oil, telephone and other main suppliers.
  • Arrange your finances – close or transfer bank accounts, savings accounts and so on, if necessary.

Traveling with kids/pets? Keep these tips in mind:

  • If you have children, separate cherished toys to travel with you.
  • Round up personal documentation – marriage/birth certificates, driving licenses and so on
    • Keep passports separate so they are not packed.
    • With regards to family pets– make sure vaccinations and documentation are up to date

Make sure you have a good moving checklist like the one we have made here! As always, Student Movers is here to help you make your moving day a success!

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Everyone at Student Movers hopes that you had a wonderful and safe New Years! Hope this next year is filled with loads of fun and prosperity for you and your family! If you are planning on finding a new home in 2016, give us a call! We would love to help you and your family settle into a new home or office. Wherever your moving needs may take you in California, give Student Movers a call!

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We know that finding a good moving company can be tough and there are so many things you need to keep in mind! As always, Student Movers wants to make sure your move goes as smooth as possible so we have compiled a list of three things you must keep in mind when finding the right moving company for you!

  1. Gather multiple estimates and make sure you thoroughly read any contract you are given
  2. Find out if the moving company has insurance or if you will need additional insurance during the move
  3. Ask for positive reviews so you can ensure that they are the right company for you!

As always, let us know if we can do anything to help you with your move! We are here to make your moving day a success!

We love getting great feedback from our customers. We love feedback, period, because it helps us grow as a company and better serve, you, our customers! Of course, positive feedback is the best, especially because then it makes our movers super happy! Our professional movers are all hard working college students, who are excited to start making a difference in their local community.

We especially love Yelp reviews because then other potential customers get to see how great our movers are! This yelp review, just made our day! So much so, that we made it into a collage to share with y’all! Thanks for the great moving company reviews everyone and Happy Thursday!

Yelp review of customers of The Student Movers

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Student Movers special carton box

You’re moving. Whether for a job, a better place to live or starting a family, it’s time to boldly go where no one… Wait, wrong trek. It can feel like you’re heading into uncharted territory, though, especially the closer you get to move day. That’s why we’re giving you our tips for moving out checklist on what to do before you move. Actually, it’s the top eleven because the first one is a given: Call us at Student Movers! You can sit back, relax and let us do the moving.

What else should you do before your move? Here we go; it’s the final pre-move countdown!

 

  1. Hire Student Movers.  We know, we already said that, but it bears repeating. You want a reputable moving company that’s been in business for a while. We have the reputation, experience, and commitment to excellence that you need to make your move smooth and successful.
  2. Rent a truck. There are many different types and sizes available to rent. Make sure you get one large enough for your things to avoid making multiple trips, but not so large as to be wasted space. Here’s another reason to call us – We provide more than muscle; we can provide wheels, too.
  3. Change your address. You can specify when you want the post office to make the change, so do the paperwork early; it’s one less thing to worry about later.
  4. Transfer utilities. Just like your mail, you can arrange all of your utilities in advance. If your move isn’t local, you also need to make arrangements for new services for your new home.
  5. Pack, pack, pack. It’s best to start packing early. You’ll have time to do it right instead of frantically tossing things in boxes at the last minute. You could also have Student Movers do it for you. One thing you should always do when packing is label your boxes by room. This makes it so much easier when it comes time to unload the truck. Every box goes to the right room right away.
  6. De-clutter. Packing for a move is the perfect time to get rid of that ugly lamp from Aunt Edna you’ve got stashed in the closet, as well as things you haven’t even seen since you’re last move. If you haven’t used it in six months and it has no great sentimental value, consider donating it.
  7. Food, wonderful food. It’s wonderful until you realize you have a full refrigerator on move day, especially if your move isn’t local. You can pack it in coolers to preserve it; just make sure you use sealable plastic bags to prevent unpleasant leaks. You could also have an eating party. Invite your friends and family over and make a buffet of the food you’re not taking with you.
  8. Plan your route. This is especially important for long-distance moves. If you need to stay overnight, make reservations now. Pack bags for each family member and also make plans for pets. Many motels are pet-friendly.
  9. Repair/Clean your old home. If you have minor repairs (holes from hanging pictures, etc.) now is the time to take care of them. Likewise, a good thorough cleaning is the key to getting your security deposit returned.
  10. Save the essential items for last. You don’t want to be caught on the road without medications, pet supplies, snacks (for you and the kids), and your phone charger. Keep all your important papers such as leases, insurance paperwork, truck rental documents and moving company information in a manila envelope for easy access.

 

There you have it, ten tips for a terrific move! One last piece of advice: Make sure to set aside some time for a stroll down memory lane. Do a walkthrough of your old home and remember the great times you had there.

 

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Professional moving service in California

You’ve moved. The truck is gone, so is our team. Now, it’s you, your family and enough boxes to build the best fort the world has ever seen. What’s next? Getting settled, that’s what. In this post, we’re giving your our top ten tips for moving in and making your new place “Home Sweet Home!”

 

  1. Um, duh anyone? However, there is a method to the madness that can be unpacking. If you read our “Final Countdown” post, all of your boxes are labeled and in the right rooms already. If not… have fun looking for toilet tissue and finding kitchen supplies instead. Set up all the furniture first; it’s easier to change locations on big items when you’re not tripping over smaller ones.
  2. Tackle the boxes. We suggest setting up the bathroom first, for obvious reasons. Then, do the living room. After a long day of packing, everyone wants a place to sit and relax, preferably without boxes. Making sure beds are ready for sleeping is the next step, followed by creating at least a minimally functional kitchen.
  3. Service, please! Test out all your services – cable, phone, internet, water, electricity/gas and any other utilities to make sure they’re working properly. This should be easy as you arranged them all in advance, right?
  4. Mail call. Check with the post office to make sure your mail is set to be delivered. Though a reprieve from junk mail is always nice, you don’t want to miss anything important.
  5. Meet the neighbors. You may be nervous about your neighbors. Well, it’s likely that they’re a bit nervous about you, too. Saying “Hello” and being friendly when you see them, or even knocking on their door and introducing yourself goes a long way toward making everyone happy. Plus, they’re great resources for local information such as stores, healthcare providers, etc.
  6. Here comes the neighborhood. Speaking of stores, etc., take some time to learn the lay of the land. Find restaurants, movie theaters, vet clinics, doctors and gyms. Locate the local hospital, too. It’s best to be prepared if an emergency arises.
  7. If you’ve moved out of your old school district, register your kids for their new school. Update your voter registration so you can do your civic duty.
  8. Now that you have a list of doctors, dentists, chiropractors, vets and eye doctors, it’s time to make some appointments and get records transferred from your former providers. Some practices may not be accepting new patients, it’s better to find out now as this helps you avoid the difficulty of getting in to see a doctor when you’re sick.
  9. Hire some help. If you used lawn care, pool cleaning, babysitting or housecleaning services in you old location, set them up for your new home.
  10. Party time! Now that you’re all settled, it’s time to throw a housewarming party. Invite your friends, family and neighbors over to see your new home. It’s not only a great way to connect with loved ones and make new friends it’s also a great way to get some nifty gifts for your new home.

 

Moving can be a stressful project if you let it. But, with the proper organization and planning – not to mention the expert help of Student Movers – you can make it smooth and enjoyable. It’s the start of a new adventure, a new part of your life. You’ve done it, now sit back, relax and enjoy!

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Tips to move your home things easily

Getting ready to move?  Wondering where you’re going to get boxes?  Wishing you’d somehow kept the boxes from your last move? Finding boxes does take a bit of leg work, but by knowing where to look, it can be the easiest part of the moving process.

  1.  Freecycle

Freecycle (www.freecycle.com) is a great website that connects people with stuff to people who need stuff. You’ll find a ton of interesting things being given away and cardboard boxes are always featured. Additionally, you might just find takers for some of the items lurking in your closets and garage that you don’t want to move.

  1.  Grocery & Retail Stores

At larger box stores, shipments come in daily.  Most of the time these boxes are broken down or crushed, bundled up, and then sent off to a recycling center.  There will be a wide range of sizes and quality, yours for the choosing. The produce boxes are particular sturdy. Ask for a manager when you inquire or simply drive around to the back of the store, look for the loading dock and approach the staff you see.  Chances are, they’re hard at work breaking down boxes that they’re only too happy to give to you instead.

  1.  Schools

This one is easy if you’ve got kids but isn’t the exclusive territory of parents.  Schools receive deliveries of food as well as office supplies.  Check first with the secretary in the office but typically speaking, schools have no more need of their boxes than retail stores.

  1.  Liquor Store

These boxes are built to hold a case of heavy glass containers.  They are the perfect size and sturdiness for books and other knick knacks.  Because liquor stores tend to be small, they may not receive shipments every day.  It may take one or two trips to hit the right day, but any staff member should be able to help you. You can always call ahead to check.

  1.  Book Stores

Speaking of books:  what better way to pack them than back in the same kind of boxes they probably came in?  Bookstores move a lot of merchandise around as well as send a lot of merchandise back, so getting boxes here can be a little trickier than other places.  If there is one in your area though, it’s worth a stop to see what they’ve got.

  1.  Social Media

How many Facebook friends do you have?  Twitter followers?  Enlist your friends and put a call out for any and all boxes that may be lurking in their attics.  Maybe they’ve got a good lead from their last move or maybe they’ve got a friend of a friend trying to get rid of some boxes.  The power of social networking can be overwhelming.  People love to help (and get rid of stuff they don’t need) so be careful what you ask for. You could end up with enough boxes for three moves!

  1.  Recycling Centers

If all else fails, put on your “grungy shoes” and head to your local recycling center.  Not only is there an entire bin dedicated to cardboard, but most people will leave boxes around the center.  See a box of old magazines?  Help the staff out by emptying the box into the paper bin and score one box for yourself.  Definitely the most labor intensive process on the list, but it also has the potential to be the most fun!

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Loyal Customer of Student Movers

Moving can be either a great adventure or a greater headache. Since we don’t know anyone who enjoys headaches, we thought we’d share some tips on how to make your next move go smoothly so that you can sit back, relax and enjoy the adventure. Of course, the best way to do this is to call the Student Movers. [grin]

 

You want to hire a reputable mover, first of all (see above). A company with a solid record in good service should have a good Better Business Bureau rating. You can look them up at BBB.org or look for the BBB logo on their website. Another way to recognize a good moving company is by their references. They should offer you a list of references upfront without you asking for them. They should be proud of their work and want to share their success stories with potential clients, just like we do on the “About” page of our site.

 

A bit of prep work on your part goes a long way, too. Decide what pieces you’re moving and what you’re selling or giving away. Whether you’re doing your own packing is something to know upfront, too. If you’re on a tight budget, packing yourself can save you money. If time is more important though, make sure you hire a mover that can pack for you; this includes providing boxes, tape and labeling.

 

When you’re ready to start, call the moving companies on your list. You should connect with a friendly, knowledgeable person who listens to you as though you’re their only client. Forget canned speeches and pitches. You need someone who will customize your quote to fit your needs, not the boxes on a form. You also need a moving company that will explain how everything works. For instance, you can see that we explain pianos, pool tables, and items in excess of 250 pounds cost extra to move. Some movers leave this information out until they hand you a bill at the end of your move.

 

Speaking of bills, it’s wise to get a few quotes. Just remember the old saying, “If it sounds too good to be true, it probably is.” If the quotes you’re getting are in the range of $1000 and someone tells you they’ll do it for $200, chances are you’re going to need all new dishes and electronics by the time your move is over. In other words, you get what you pay for and those “cut rate” fees typically come with “cut rate” service.

 

Some good questions to ask your potential movers (unless we answer them for you first) are:

 

  • Are there extra charges for extra flights of stairs that I didn’t know about when I booked?
  • What is the estimated delivery time and how does the driver notify me?
  • If I pack myself, are there types of boxes/packing material I should avoid?
  • What forms of payment are acceptable and when do I pay?
  • Do you disassemble and reassemble everything?

 

We may joke here, but we take our business – your move –  seriously. We hope this information is helpful to you in planning your next move. If you have any questions, we’re here to help at www.thestudentmovers.com!

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